Bush Decides to Keep Guantánamo Open

October 21, 2008

WASHINGTON — Despite his stated desire to close the American prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, President Bush has decided not to do so, and never considered proposals drafted in the State Department and the Pentagon that outlined options for transferring the detainees elsewhere, according to senior administration officials.  >>>>>>

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Gitmo prosecutor consulted priest for help

October 17, 2008

Struggling with orders to prosecute a young detainee at Guantanamo Bay, U.S. Army Lt. Col. Darrel Vandeveld went online and consulted a well-known Jesuit priest for help with his concerns about the fairness of the military tribunals…

The Rev. John Dear, a Jesuit priest and social activist, encouraged Vandeveld to quit, telling him the U.S. operation at Guantanamo is “a sham.” “God does not want you to participate in any injustice, and GITMO is so bad, I hope and pray you will quietly, peacefully, prayerfully, just resign, and start your life over,” Dear wrote in his e-mail. >>>>>

Those with sound minds and well-meaning hearts are starting to come to.


Guantanamo prosecutor accuses Pentagon of ethical misconduct in terrorist trials

October 15, 2008

Father John Dear, a Roman Catholic peace activist, advised the devout military lawyer that he could “save lives” if he resigned and spoke out against the behaviour of the Penatagon. “I don’t know how else the creeping rot of the commissions and the politics that fostered and continued to surround them could be exposed to the curative powers of the sunlight,” said Lt Col Vandeveld. “I care not for myself; our enemies deserve nothing less than what we would expect from them were the situations reversed. More than anything, I hope we can rediscover some of our American values.”  >>>>>


Public At Last Guantánamo’s SERE Standard Operating Procedures

October 14, 2008

One of the most important documents of the U.S. torture program has just become publicly available for the first time. This is the JTF GTMO “SERE” Interrogation Standard Operating Procedure, now posted on the website of the new documentary, Torturing Democracy. This document clearly specifies that the abusive interrogation techniques to be used at Guantamo [JTF GTMO] are based upon the military’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape [SERE] program. The document is notable for its documentation of the extent to which abuse was bureaucratically standardized for routineuse. http://www.uruknet.de/?p=m47935&hd=&size=1&l=e


Freed Sudanese Detainee Tells of Torture at Guantanamo

October 10, 2008

At a press conference he held Thursday at the premises of the International Civil Aid Organisation in Khartoum, Mr Mustafa said that he went to Pakistan for education and trade, but he and others were arrested after the incidents of September 11 by local elements in Pakistan and were handed over to the American forces.

He said that they were then transported to Guantanamo prison where several aspects of torture had been inflicted on them, adding that no one can avoid torture unless he says that he had participated in the war against the Americans.  >>>>>


Guantanamo techniques applied on US soil: civil rights groups

October 9, 2008

The military documents, including regular emails between military officers, were obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, and detail the detention and interrogation at naval prisons in Virginia and South Carolina.

They focus on three “enemy combatants:” two US citizens, Jose Padilla and Yaser Hamdi, and a legal resident, Ali al-Marri.  >>>>>


Judge orders 17 Chinese Muslims released from Guantanamo Bay

October 8, 2008

The judge’s order came more than six years after the men were sent to Guantanamo and more than four years after the Pentagon cleared most of them to be released. The Supreme Court ruled four months ago that judges can order the release of prisoners wrongly held at Guantanamo…

“The U.S. government has long recognized these men did not pose, and really never posed, a threat to the United States,” said Jennifer Daskal, a lawyer for Human Rights Watch. Tuesday’s ruling was significant, she said, because a judge “rejected the Bush administration’s theory that its own determination can trump judicial review and constitutional rights.”  >>>>>